Xavier Bracy class 5-888 1 . A lake is a body of a motionless water that

ocean today

usually has a river feeding into or draining of

ocean today

2 . a lake usually coutain fresh water has a river feeding into of it


3 . most freshwater lakes on earth are found north areas of the northern hemispherem canada for example is estimate to have around 2 milons millonslakes .

4 .located on the border of the united state and canada are the greate lake of north america they include 5 facts lakes michigan , huran , lake erie , ontario , and superior which together coutain around 21 persent of the world freshwater supply . alot lakes today are artificially made to graded hydro eletric power

OCEAN TODAY . COM



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Brian Rivera Class 5-999

Facts about Lake Ecosystem

1. A lake is an inland body of relatively motionless water that usually has a river or stream feeding into or draining out of it.

2. lakes differ to lagoos and estuaries due to the fact they are not connected to the ocean.A lake is also larger and deeper then other inland water bodies such as ponds.

3. the study of inland water badies and ecostytems is called limnolay.

4. a lake usually contains freshwater but some can be saltwater.

5. each lake has a larger catchment area [draingage basin,watrshed] which is a large encompassing land area where surface water from rain,snowlice melt, or rivers converger into the lower lying lake.

6. water in most lakes flows in and out via rivers and streams lakes that only lose water seepage are called endorheic lakes.

7. the lawest lake in the world is the dead seatha borders lsrael and jordan.the surface level of which is 418 metres [1,371 ft] below sea level.it is also one of the saltiest lakes in the world.



Western Finger Lakes
Western Finger Lakes

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Hi my name is Madelin my partner is keili .Me and my partner will be working on the lake ecosystem.Get ready to see some amazing facts about the lake.

Madelin Lake facts

1.Salty and fresh, lakes are some of the only freely available water sources on land.

2.Aside from rivers and strem,the rest of the world refreshed is locked up in ice or trapped under ground.

3.Yet much remains mysterious about these important natrual resorces.

4.There are over 1 million lakes in the united state.

5.The worlds largest lake is the Great Lake.


Food Pyramid
food web:

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Madelin Definitions
Ecosystem:A habitat that many animals live in.
Population:a amount of people in a type of area.
Niche:The position or function of an organism in a community of an organism in a community of plants and animals.
Community:A group of people animal living in the same place or having a particular characteristic in common.
Biome:A large naturally occupying community of flora and fauna occupy.ing a major habitat.
Madelin Lake videos
http;/tu.behttp://you/hn2sdLeBzpQ
This video talks about the importance of lakes and it tells you a little about rivers.
http://youtu.be/hhn2sblebzpq
http:youtu.be/9iQd-3JqT3o
This video talks about the importance of lakes and the thing that are near the lakes that fall in the lakes and the animals eat.

LAKE ECOSYSTEM FACTS:JASAILEY ROSARIO CLASS:5-888

1.THE STUDY OF INLAND WATER BODIES AND ECOSYSTEMS IS CALLED LIMNOLOGY.

2. A LAKE USUALLY CONTAINS FRESH WATER BUT SOME CAN BE SAITWATER.

3.MOST FRESHWATER LAKES ON EARTH ARE FOUND IN NORTHERN HEMISPHERE AREAS

CANADA FOR EXAMPLE IS ESTIMATED TO HAVE AROUND 2 MILLION LAKES.

4. A LAKE IS AN INLAND BODY OF RELATIVELY MOTIONLESS WATER THAT USUALLY HAS A RIVER OR

STREAM FEEDING INTO OR DRAINING OUT OF IT.

5.LAKES ARE INTERSING.

JASAILEY ROSARIO DEFINTION:

1.ECOSYSTEM:A BIOLOGICAL COMMUNITY OF INTERACTING ORGANISMS AND THEIR PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT.

2.POPULATION: ALL THE INHABITANTS OF A PARTICULAR TOWN AREA OR COUNTRY.

3.COMMUNITY:A GROUP OF PEOPLE ANIMALS LIVING IN THE SAME PLACE OR HAVING A PARTICULAR CHARACTER.

4:NICHE:THE POSITION OR FUNCTION OF AN ORGANISM IN A COMMUNITY OF PLANTS AND ANIMALS.

5:BIOME: A LARGE NATURALLY OCCURING COMMUNITY OF FLORA AND FAUNA OCCUPYING A MAJOR HABITAT.


LAKE ECOSYSTEMS : Ashley Nunez & Amanda cruz


Ashley Nunez
Heyy There ! My Name Is Ashley Nunez And Im Here Too Show You Info About The Lake Ecosystem !! Feeling excited right ?! But ... First Let Me Tell You A Little More About me : Im 10 Years Old And Im In Class 5-1 And my partner is Luzeli villa and i'm in the science club with her and i'm in 5th grade getting ready for m.s and I Choose this ecosystem because i really wanted to find out more so i can tell you guys who haven't Heard of it. ANYWAYS ... Lets get started!
Lake Ecosystem Project
Project By: Ashley Nunez , AMANDA CRUZ

By: Ashley Nunez
A Lake Ecosystem Is Made Up Of Living And Non-Living Parts That All Interact With Each Other To Form a Stable System. These Interactions Assure The Lake Ecosystem Health. It is fine Balance Production Decompostion Made Possible By The Biodiversity That Occurs In A Healthy Lake Ecosystem.
North America is home to one of the world's most remarkable ecosystems. Carved out by glaciers during the last ice age, the Great Lakes contain nearly 20% of the earth's fresh water. Only the polar ice caps contain more. This wealth of water and the glacially-sculpted landscape of the basin support a tremendous abundance and diversity of life.
As the last glaciers began retreating some 14,000 years ago, they left an ecological frontier rich in new habitats that were rapidly exploited by species immigrating from the east, south and west. These biological pioneers formed new communities that could thrive in the specialized environments created by the glaciers and sustained by the Great Lakes. As populations adapted to the special conditions in the basin, new forms of life began to evolve, further enriching the biological diversity of this unique area.
Geologically, the Great Lakes ecosystem is very young and can be thought of as an evolutionary laboratory. Species that have evolved here have done so in a remarkably short period of time, and the processes that support their continuing adaptation in this dynamic environment need to be safeguarded. Species and community types at the margins of their ranges, or with their last occurrences here, are also an important part of this evolutionary laboratory. These features are most likely to respond to environmental pressures and evolve into new forms of life that are best suited to survive in the Great Lakes ecosystem.
The lakes, and the basin that they drain, have played a major role in the history and development of the United States and Canada. The basin supports more than one- tenth of the U.S. population and more than one- fourth of the population of Canada. Nearly 25% of the total Canadian agricultural production and 7% of the U.S. agricultural production occur in the basin. Some of the world's largest concentrations of industrial capacity are located around the Great Lakes.
Human use has adversely impacted the basin ecosystem. In the last 20 years, much has been done to stem the input of nutrients and toxic chemicals into the basin, initiating a rebound in the health of the ecosystem. Although some lake communities have undergone major changes, and some species have been lost, the ecosystem as a whole still supports special biological resources. However, certain human activities continue to pose threats to the maintenance of biological diversity in the Great Lakes basin.


Lake Ecosystem Project !
By : Ashley Nunez

Temperature :

Temperature Is An Important abiotic Factor in lentic Ecosystems because most of biota are poikilotthermic, where internal body temperatures are defined by the surrounding system. Water can be heated or cooled through radiation at the surface and conduction to or from the air and surrounding substrate
(Giller and Malmqvist 1998). Shallow ponds often have a continuous temperature gradient from warmer waters at the surface to cooler waters at the bottom. In addition, temperature fluctuations can be very great in these systems, both diurnally and seasonally (Brown 1987).
Temperature regimes are very different in large lakes (Fig. 2). In temperate regions, for example, as air temperatures increase, the icy layer formed on the surface of the lake breaks up, leaving the water at approximately 4 °C. This is the temperature at which water has the highest density. As the season progresses, the warmer air temperatures heat the surface waters, making them less dense. The deeper waters remain cool and dense due to reduced light penetration. As the summer begins, two distinct layers become established, with such a large temperature difference between them that they remain stratified. The lowest zone in the lake is the coldest and is called the hypolimnion. The upper warm zone is called the epilimnion. Between these zones is a band of rapid temperature change called the thermocline. During the colder fall season, heat is lost at the surface and the epilimnion cools. When the temperatures of the two zones are close enough, the waters begin to mix again to create a uniform temperature, an event termed lake turnover. In the winter, inverse stratification occurs as water near the surface cools freezes, while warmer, but denser water remains near the bottom. A thermocline is established, and the cycle repeats (Brown 1987, Brönmark and Hansson 2005).

Lake Ecosystem Summary

By Zuleima Baez, Tabitha Guzman, Celia Irizarry

A lake ecosystem is made up of living and nonliving parts that all interact with each other to form a stable system. These interactions assure the lake ecosystem’s health and sustainability. It is a fine balance of production and decomposition, made possible by the biodiversity that occurs in a healthy lake ecosystem.
Lake ecosystem
An ecosystem is the interaction of the living and non-living elements of a particular environment such as lakes. ocean. forest or meadow.
A lake is an ecosystem all in itself. It contains zones based on the light penetration. Not based on the fish and zooplankton that inhabit the lake. The coastline area of a lake that is permanently under water comprises the littoral zone. In this zone sunlight reaches the bottom of the lake. The temperature of this zone is greatly impacted by weather.
  • Goldfish have been reported to have a memory that lasts less than three seconds. However, in February 2008, the Daily Telegraph stated that an Australian student proved that theory incorrect. The student, Rory Stokes of the Australian Science and Mathematics School, placed a beacon in a tank with food once a day for three weeks. The goldfish ate the food until the beacon was completely removed from the tank for a period of six days. Then, when the beacon and food were returned to the tank, the goldfish immediately went to the beacon, indicating that they did recall the food source for nearly one week This experiment can be used as the basis for further research to determine how long the memory of a goldfish is by removing the beacon for increasingly longer periods of time.

Maze

  • Goldfish can communicate with one another, as well as manipulate a maze, if necessary, to find food. Students in the higher grade levels can prove this fact through using their own ingenuity to build a maze inside of an aquarium and placing a lone goldfish in the water. As time progresses the students will discover that the goldfish will attempt to manipulate the maze and eventually find the food source. NECN.com reports that one high school student in New England found that after her first goldfish was capable of making its way through the maze, that same goldfish then assisted a second goldfish in finding its way through the maze as well. Students should take notes on a daily basis on the progress of the experiment and compare the results of the project with his or her original hypothesis.

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A lake is a body of relatively still fresh or salt water of considerable size, localized in a basin that is surrounded by land. Lakes are inland and not part of the ocean, and are larger and deeper than ponds.[1][2] Lakes can be contrasted with rivers or streams, which are usually flowing. However most lakes are fed and drained by rivers and streams.
Natural lakes are generally found in mountainous areas, rift zones, and areas with ongoing glaciation. Other lakes are found in endorheic basins or along the courses of mature rivers. In some parts of the world there are many lakes because of chaotic drainage patterns left over from the last Ice Age. All lakes are temporary over geologic time scales, as they will slowly fill in with sediments or spill out of the basin containing them.
Many lakes are artificial and are constructed for industrial or agricultural use, for hydro-electric power generation or domestic water supply, or for aesthetic or recreational purposes.